Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table

Voici le gabarit que j’ai conçu pour fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table. Ce genre de brides permet au dessus de table de bois de bouger librement suite aux changements d’humidité saisonniers.

Here’s a jig a devised to mill tabletop fixing blocks. This kind of blocks will allow any wooden tabletop to move freely with changes of seasonal humidity.


Une butée est collée et clouée sur une chute de MDF 1/4″ d’environ 6″ carré.

A stop is glued and nailed to a 6″ square 1/4″ MDF scrap.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


J’installe une fraise 5/8″ dans la table à toupie (défonceuse) et j’ajuste la hauteur juste au dessus du MDF 1/4″.

I installed a 5/8″ straight bit in the router table and I set the height just above the 1/4″ MDF.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


J’ai déposé la pièce que je veux utiliser pour mes brides (notez la ligne centrale tracée) sur le gabarit et je règle le guide de la table à toupie pour l’aligner avec centre de la fraise, tel que montré.

I dropped the workpiece I want to use for my fixing blocks (notice the drew center line) on the jig and I’m setting the router table fence to align it with the center of the router bit, as shown.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


Après avoir ajouté la butée A, je descends lentement le gabarit sur la fraise pour faire une rainure d’environ 1-1/2″ de long.

Le gabarit est terminé.

After I installed the stop B, I slowly drop the jig on the spinning router bit to make a 1-1/2″ long slot (approx).

The jis is done.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


Après avoir tracé à environ 1/4″ de l’extrémité de la pièce pour localiser le gabarit, je serre cette dernière entre la butée du gabarit et les mâchoires de l’étau. Notez que la surface de 6″ carré a été prévue pour supporter adéquatement la toupie.

After tracing about a 1/4″ from the end of the workpiece to locate the jig, I secure this latter between the stop of the jig and the jaws of the bench vise. Notice that the 6″ square area has been planned to adequately support the router.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


Ayant le luxe de posséder deux toupies plongeantes, j’ai installé sur chacune une bague de gabarit de 5/8″, même diamètre que la rainure réalisée dans le gabarit, ainsi que des fraises droites de 3/8″ et 3/16″.

Having the luxury to own two plunge routers, I installed a 5/8″ guide bushing in each one, 5/8″ being the same diameter as the slot previously milled in the jig, as well as a 3/8″ and a 3/16″ straight router bits.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


Après avoir réalisé une première passe à mi-bois avec la fraise 3/8″, j’ai réalisé plusieurs passes peu profondes (pensez fraise mince), au travers de la pièce, avec la fraise de 3/16″.

After running a first halfway through pass with the 3/8″ bit, I ran several shallow passes (think small bit), all the way through, using the 3/16″ bit.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


J’ai tracé l’emplacement d’une rainure transversale entre chaque rainure et tracé l’emplacement de chacune des autres rainures, et ainsi de suite. Vous comprendrez que l’utilisation de deux toupies est beaucoup ici beaucoup plus rapide !

I marked the location for a dado between each slot and marked the location of each of the remaining slots and so on. You will understand that here using two routers is much faster !

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


Après avoir réalisé les rainures transversales au banc de scie à l’aide du guide à onglets, j’ai poncé et coupé mes brides.

After I milled the dadoes at the table saw using the miter gauge, I sanded and cut my blocks.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


Finalement, elles sont prêtes à être glissées sous cette table dans des rainures réalisées dans les traverses et ensuite vissées sous le dessus de la table.

Finally, they are ready to be slipped under this table in grooves milled in the aprons and then screwed under the tabletop.

Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table


De telles brides démontrent bien le talent et l’effort que l’artisan a investi dans son travail.

Such fixing blocks definitely demonstrate the craftsmanship and the effort invested by the craftsman into his work.


Inscrivez-vous gratuitement en haut à droite et…

Bon bricolage !

Register for free at the upper right and…

Happy Woodworking !

Advertisements

24 Responses to Milling Tabletop Fixing Blocks / Fabriquer des brides de retenue pour dessus de table

  1. Denis Lock says:

    It is not necessary to mill slots in shrinkage buttons. A countersunk hole the size of the screw being used is all that is necessary. Wood only moves (shrinks/expands) across the grain. There is no movement with the grain. If slots are justified then the slot in the left button of your last picture should be at right angles to its current orientation. Unless you glue the shrinkage buttons into the apron pieces the slots serve no purpose. The contact area of the bottom of the button against the table top is much greater than the contact area of the nib of the button in the apron grooves. Thus the friction is much greater. Any movement of the table top will result in movement of the nib relative to the apron, not of the button relative to the table top. The slots serve no purpose.

    • Thank you Denis for sharing your thoughts.

      Well, they may not be compulsory, but where I live the humidity at its lowest in Winter is about 35 and at its highest in Summer is around 85. However, the main think is I like woodworking.

      Besides that, do inlays have any purpose on a tabletop ? Once again, it’s a matter of choice !

      Best,

      • Denis Lock says:

        Hi Serge
        I made the mistake of focussing on the application and not the technique. I apologise. The latter is far more important and your post brings home the power of guide bush routing. Thank you for selfishly sharing your insights. I have recommended your site to all of my students. Did you notice an increase of South African subscribers a short while back?

        Regards – Denis Lock

        • Denis,

          Thank you for adding this comment. Any of your students reading this post will certainly appreciate your sense of clarifying your thoughts.

          Since I can’t say where my readers come from only by their email addresses, I can’t say I noticed an increase from South Africa. However, I’m glad you did.

          Best,

  2. Bob Moyle says:

    You’re always thinking one step ahead Serge. I’m surprised you have time to sleep with all these ideas floating around in your mind.
    Well done as always.

    Bob from Down Under.

  3. Nicely done Serge.

  4. Mark Butler says:

    Your inventions always amaze me Serge. And yes, these homemade blocks add greatly to the craftsmanship of the table.
    Mark

  5. Chris Wong says:

    Salut Serge,

    Nice build, but I’m not sure that the slots are necessary. I usually just use a clearance hole and mount the tabletop buttons with a bit of clearance all around.

    Chris

  6. diggerjack says:

    Salut Serge
    Tutoriel très instructif et très bien fait ( comme d’habitude !)
    Tu as tout à fait raison de parler de variation du taux d’humidité et tes brides peuvent éviter bien des dégâts n’en déplaise à certains.
    Le bois travaille et il n’y a pas pire déception que de voir un de ces projets ( souvent le plus beau ou celui dans lequel on s’est beaucoup investi ou un projet offert à quelqu’un qu’on apprécie beaucoup) se décoller ou se fendre à cause des fameuses variations de taux d’humidité.

    Merci encore pour ce message sur ton blog ( en progression je suppose ..)

    Au plaisir

    • Salut Jack,

      Désolé mon cher, rien n’est progression en rapport avec cet article. L’idée était de transmettre la technique et le gabarit.

      Et merci d’avoir pris le temps d’ajouter ton commentaire et tes bonnes paroles très encourageantes.

      Au plaisir…

      • diggerjack says:

        Salut Serge

        La progression de ton blog ne concernait pas forcément cet article mais l’ensemble de ton oeuvre.

        Merci pour le gabarit pour ceux qui voudraient l’utiliser ( J’en fait parti)

        Au plaisir

  7. deadprez3030 says:

    I like the slots. If not serving the purpose of allowing the wood to move they allow one to make adjustments. Furthermore, this was a demo about the milling of the blocks….. while not completely necessary in THIS application, they apply in other areas greatly. Again, not a demo of the application of the blocks, merely a demonstration of how one COULD (not must) quickly and easily mill them. Don’t discourage the man for what he’s doing “your comment was less useful than the slots he milled in these blocks” is what I say. Keep up these things Serge! I’m a seasoned carpenter and I can always take away some new knowledge when I read these, it’s cool to see the tricks of the trade from Europe that we have a different way of doing in the US. Always a pleasure!

  8. Pat says:

    Serge, I guess it depends where you place the blocks on the tabletop whether your doing this in the summer or winter. Appreciate all your work. Was wondering would it be possible to add a translator program to the response section? Thanks Pat

    • Pat, the main purpose of those slotted fixing blocks is the fact they won’t interfere with wood movement, no matter when it was built during the year.

      WordPress don’t seem to feature such translator program. I suggest you do as I do, what is copy and paste a comment and have it translated by Google Translate by using another windows.

      Best,
      Serge

      • Pat says:

        Serge, I would think it DOES matter where they are placed in relation to when the table is assembled. If you do it in the winter when the wood is at its tightest and place them tight against the stringers then in the summer when it want to expand it won’t be able to move out past them? Or do you make them long enough so you can leave a space at the stringer to allow for it to move either way?

        • Pat, you’re right, the location matters. Take a look a this picture, which should open in a separate window. If the screw is driven in the center of the right block slot, the wood movement won’t be restrained. According to the left block, the location of the screw doesn’t matter since there is none or so little wood movement. The main thing here is if the left block is secured leaning against the corner post, here, and only here wood expansion can’t happen, unless the block is relocated about 1/4″ from the corner post. A good rule would be always drive the screws in the middle of the slots and don’t lean any blocks sideways against anything (ex. legs, stretchers, crossbars, etc.)

          By the way, my fixing blocks always bottom out in all grooves, and my screws are always centered in the slots.

          Best,

          • Pat says:

            I see now what you mean if its in the middle of the routed slot the wood can move within that space. Thanks so much for making this clear for me. Just trying to learn as I go. Pat

          • Pat, I’m glad I’ve been able to clarify the technique enough so you’d catch all of it.

            Best,

Leave a Reply / Laissez une réponse

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s