Prevent Slotted Screw Slipping Nicks / Prévenir les entailles lors de glissements du tournevis

Compte tenu que je suis habitué d’utiliser des vis à tête carrée (Robertson) et cruciforme (Phillips) il m’arrive souvent de glisser lors du serrage de vis à tête fendue, même si je suis aussi prudent que possible et même lors de l’utilisation d’un tournevis à main.

Since I’m used to square drive head (Robertson) and cross head (Phillips) screws I often slip went I drive slotted head screws, even if I try to be as careful as possible and even when using a hand held screwdriver.


En fabriquant ce projet en pin il m’est venu à l’idée d’ajouter un bouclier autour de la tête de vis pour prévenir une entaille si mon tournevis glisse. Et il l’a fait !

Building this project out of pine I came out with the idea of adding a shield around the screw head to prevent any dent if my screwdriver should slip. And it did !

Prevent Slotted Screw Slipping Nicks / Prévenir les entailles lors de glissements du tournevis


Par chance le bouclier a écopé de l’entaille, et non mon projet fini. Mon bouclier un simple couvercle de plastique d’un contenant de produit laitier que j’ai percé pour la dimension de la tête de la vis.

Luckily the shield got the dent, not my finished project. My shield is a simple dairy plastic lid that I punch for the screw head size.

Prevent Slotted Screw Slipping Nicks / Prévenir les entailles lors de glissements du tournevis


Prevent Slotted Screw Slipping Nicks / Prévenir les entailles lors de glissements du tournevis


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11 Responses to Prevent Slotted Screw Slipping Nicks / Prévenir les entailles lors de glissements du tournevis

  1. Mark Butler says:

    Great idea Serge. This is why I don’t like using slotted screws but sometimes you have to.
    Mark

    • Thanks Mark. Yep, sometimes we have to, reason why I had to share this tip. 😉

      Serge

      PS: Did you get your newsletter (if you signed up) announcing that Baltic birch plywood (most) are 20% Off ?

      • Mark Butler says:

        Serge

        Yes I got the news about the baltic birch going on sale. My plan is to pick it up on my way through Montreal before Christmas.

        The good news is that my wife is flying to Calgary to see her family and I will meet her at the airport in Toronto so I don’t have to explain to her why we have to take a detour through Montreal on what is already a long drive!

        I don’t know how long it is on sale so I was going to call them to see if I could order it now and pick it up later. I’ll get it even if it’s not on sale because it’s still a good price for something I have never had an opportunity to work with and I can’t get where I live.

        Thanks again for another helpful tip. I would never have known about Langevin Forest otherwise.
        Mark

  2. Sylvain says:

    Beau truc mais pourquoi utilisé un tournevis à tête plate… ? La seule chose qui motive ce choix, c’est de vouloir reproduire un “look” ancestral, pour une porte qui est constament utilisée…. pas certain

    • Merci Sylvain. À noter que je ne suis pas masochiste et que j’utilise les vis à tête fendue uniquement lorsque nécessaire. Lors de la prise de la photo, je devais enfoncer des vis martelées qui s’adaptaient et étaient fournies avec les charnières. 😉

      Au plaisir…

  3. Bruce Smith says:

    As an ex gunsmith, I learned that the screwdriver blade thickness and width MUST match the screw slot. If the blade is thinner than the slot only the two outer corners touch the screw and then it will slip. Thanks for all the tips.

    Bruce

    • Thank you very much, Bruce, for the reminder. I had completely forgot about it since I don’t use them often. This is probably the reason why sets of screwdrivers always include several sizes of screwdriver blades.

      Best,

  4. Jim says:

    Nice idea, Serge. I hate slotted screw heads. This reminded me of what I do to drill holes in a drywall ceiling. I drill the hole in the lid first, then hold the lid against the ceiling(after I get the bit started). Then I drill the hole. The lid catches most of the drywall dust. Jim

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